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The Pamir Institute is an activist research and publications group which aims at empowering the autochnous populations of “Bam e Dunya”, the “Roof of the World”. Its area of concern embraces the Pamirs from Afghanistan, China, Pakistan and Tajikistan.

Pamir has been, for a long time, a remote and a neglected High Asia region. However, its inhabitants are now facing fast and traumatic upheavals due to terrorist threat, Taliban submersion, Chinese expansionism and Pakistan external interferences.
This enforces the need for a transnational vision.

News

Pamir Institute: How can a soldier overnight become a Taliban

‘How can a soldier overnight become a Taliban ?’

The fall of Wakhan: part one
This article is first part of a series based on conversations with the people in Wakhan Corridor over a period of two months. The conversations were in Wakhi and have been edited for clarity. Names of the people have been changed to protect their identities

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This is a local testimony coming from a region being ignored by regular media. In upper northeastern Afghanistan, Shugnan has similar people and values with the bordering Tajik Pamir. A young man, Arif Pamirzad, explains us how traditional strong women's position and education are under threat as a consequence of the recent fall of the district. He calls the Taliban rulers to adopt a responsible policy in order to protect the next generation and the future of his people.

Shugnan’s Women Condition under Taliban Regime

This is a local testimony coming from a region being ignored by regular media. In upper northeastern Afghanistan, Shugnan has similar people and values with the bordering Tajik Pamir. A young man, Arif Pamirzad, explains us how traditional strong women’s position and education are under threat as a consequence of the recent fall of the district. He calls the Taliban rulers to adopt a responsible policy in order to protect the next generation and the future of his people.

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Pamir Institute Life has always been very difficult in Wakhan. It is one of the poorest regions of Afghanistan, one of the poorest countries of the world. Until recently, it was safe and peaceful. The fall of Wakhan dismantled the fragile balance which allowed the population to satisfy its reasonable and limited daily needs.

Afghan Wakhan livelihood. The road to hell

Life has always been very difficult in Wakhan. It is one of the poorest regions of Afghanistan, one of the poorest countries of the world. Until recently, it was safe and peaceful. The Taliban invasion dismantled the fragile balance which allowed the population to satisfy to face its daily reasonable and limited needs.Asad Wakhi is a young man from central Wakhan. Today, he gave us some direct insight about the struggle his people is facing

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Panj-River, Afghan Big Pamir and second part of Afghan Wakhan corridor to Little Pamir, as seen from Langar, Tajikistan

With closed borders, the  Afghan Wahan has, now, to rely on Tajik citizens solidarity for phone & internet

Afghan Wakhan is the corridor stretching between the town of Ishkashim (Afghanistan) and Chinese border. It has no public infrastructure such as hospital, actual car road and phone network. However, from Ishkashim (Afghanistan) to Gaz Khan (Afghanistan), it is possible to use the TCell network going from Ishakahim (Tajikistan) to Langar (Tajikistan), on the opposite bank of th Panj River, but buying units became a nightmare since Taliban invasion..

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How a poor region of Afghanistan sinks into famine under Taliban rule

This is an outstanding but highly alarming direct testimony from an altitude remote and forgotten Afghan region. Far away from any media, the harsh and poor life of local people has been turned, by Taliban, into dereliction and extreme misery. Trapped in a full lockdown, people cannot escape what became a hell with no hope.
Those who, at an international level, whitewash the reputation of the Taliban 2.0 should reflect on the heavy responsibility they are taking.

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Research Papers

Portraits, Wakhi in relation with other people of their areas

The origin of the less than 100,000 Wakhi people is Wakhan corridor from where they emigrated but also where they, sometimes, partly came back. Their movements are explained by religion changes (Zoroastrian, Buddhism, Islam), trade, pastoralism, wars (Chinese, Tibetan, Arabs…), oppressions from local rulers (Wakhan Mirs), or more distant ones (Badakhshan Emirs, Bukhara Emirs, Yarkand Khan…), Afghanistan’s harsh annexion with the Pashtun Abdur Raman, Russian and Chinese communism, etc.

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Other Publications

Should foreign travelers hide part of their Pakistan experience, in the interest of local populations?

In no country you can be asked so frequently a question like “What do you think about Pakistan?”. It is not an open question. The expectation is to hear the positive message you will deliver. But real life and real countries are more complicated. Particularly, when you have to talk about a state led by Imran Khan who waged months of a hybrid war against your homeland.

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Can we believe in what travelers say about Pakistan? Are they accurate, fair and independent?

Pakistan is a new eldorado for Vloggers and Instagrammers, especially young attractive ladies, who enjoy a support they could not find in other countries. Authorities and national companies find, here, an efficient PR tool in their attemp for creating a country new image. On their side, these travelers can enjoy a mass of followers they could not reach in other less gender seperated societies, offering them the precious status of “influencers”.

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Resources

Wakhi people and Pamir life ex-libris

In this Ex-Libris are some selected readings about history, traditions, religion, way of life and geographical locations of Wakhi people in High Asia. It was prepared for the travelers who intend to visit the Gojal Valley (Upper Hunza, Pakistan) or Wakhan Corridor (Tajikistan & Afghanistan). It could, also, be a post-travel tool to organise ground observations and to see them in a wider perspective.

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About Us

A transnational group of independant activists & researchers not affiliated to any party or government.
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